Do Not Stand At My Grave And Weep

Mary Elizabeth Frye

Written in 1932 and routinely voted as America’s favourite poem, Do Not Stand at my Grave and Weep was taught in schools everywhere. I remember studying it from my schooldays. Mary Elizabeth Frye found herself composing a piece of verse on a brown paper shopping bag. Later she said that the words "just came to her" and expressed what she felt about life and death. A very sweet poem. Love, Susie x

Do Not Stand At My Grave And Weep.

Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow.
I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain.
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning’s hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry;
I am not there; I did not die.

Mary Elizabeth Frye (1905 – 2004)


The Vampire's Wife